Marc Varisco, VFX Supervisor
BY: ADMIN | CATEGORIES: | TAG: , , ,
Marc Varisco, VFX Supervisor
BY: ADMIN | CATEGORIES: | TAG: , , ,

Meet RSP’s New VFX Supervisor, Marc Varisco.

Marc Varisco VFX Supervisor Interview

The Pursuit of Excellence

A new addition to RSP, Marc Varisco arrived in Adelaide with a sterling resume whose highlights include Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, nominated for an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, as well as the Tony Scott films The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, Domino, Déjà vu and Man on Fire. Having begun his career in his native Melbourne, Marc pursued his visual effects muse to Singapore, Vancouver and Los Angeles, before returning to Australia. At RSP, Marc has led VFX teams on upcoming projects, The Water Diviner, Deadline Gallipoli, and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 (in tandem with Tim Crosbie).

RSP: Marc, you began your career when you were just 17 at a small shop, Animagraphx in Melbourne. Tell us about your introduction to the business.

Marc Varisco: At Animagraphx, I did a lot of traditional animation, stop motion, motion graphics under a rostrum camera, old Robert Abel type stuff . Opticals done in a lab. It was good to learn how things were done before there was software to solve everything. We did it all by hand.

RSP: You liked the tactile nature of it?

MV: I worked with Steven Spielberg’s editor, Michael Kahn, on Minority Report. Until 2005 or 6, he was still cutting on a flatbed. He cut from the heart, rather than simply turning out versions on an Avid.

RSP: Did you know right away that you wanted to make a career in visual effects?

MV: It was more a fascination back in the day. I never expected to be working on feature films. Working on commercials was already pretty amazing. My career developed quite nicely through Singapore and then Canada, where I got to do TV series and movies-of-the-week. When I first got to LA, I did a lot of commercials and music videos. Back then when I turned on MTV,  pretty much every video was one I’d worked on. I worked with Metallica, Janet Jackson, Jennifer Lopez. It was a lot of fun.

RSP: You’ve been supervising for quite a while now. Do you miss the hands-on work of an artist?

MV: Visual effects is a collaborative effort. There needs to be someone to point everyone in the right direction. These days, I barely have time to sit down at my computer. I’m either looking over the shoulder of the guys or reviewing work in a theatre. I normally spend my nights doing cineSync with the rest of the world. It’s different supervising in a facility like RSP. Formerly, I was generally attached to a production and saw shots through from shooting to finish. Now, I’m generally on the receiving end of stuff that’s already been shot.

RSP: What do you hope to accomplish at RSP?

MV: That’s simple. Maintain the high standards the shop is known for, and deliver on time and on budget.

Meet RSP’s New VFX Supervisor, Marc Varisco.

Marc Varisco VFX Supervisor Interview

The Pursuit of Excellence

A new addition to RSP, Marc Varisco arrived in Adelaide with a sterling resume whose highlights include Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, nominated for an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, as well as the Tony Scott films The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, Domino, Déjà vu and Man on Fire. Having begun his career in his native Melbourne, Marc pursued his visual effects muse to Singapore, Vancouver and Los Angeles, before returning to Australia. At RSP, Marc has led VFX teams on upcoming projects, The Water Diviner, Deadline Gallipoli, and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 (in tandem with Tim Crosbie).

RSP: Marc, you began your career when you were just 17 at a small shop, Animagraphx in Melbourne. Tell us about your introduction to the business.

Marc Varisco: At Animagraphx, I did a lot of traditional animation, stop motion, motion graphics under a rostrum camera, old Robert Abel type stuff . Opticals done in a lab. It was good to learn how things were done before there was software to solve everything. We did it all by hand.

RSP: You liked the tactile nature of it?

MV: I worked with Steven Spielberg’s editor, Michael Kahn, on Minority Report. Until 2005 or 6, he was still cutting on a flatbed. He cut from the heart, rather than simply turning out versions on an Avid.

RSP: Did you know right away that you wanted to make a career in visual effects?

MV: It was more a fascination back in the day. I never expected to be working on feature films. Working on commercials was already pretty amazing. My career developed quite nicely through Singapore and then Canada, where I got to do TV series and movies-of-the-week. When I first got to LA, I did a lot of commercials and music videos. Back then when I turned on MTV,  pretty much every video was one I’d worked on. I worked with Metallica, Janet Jackson, Jennifer Lopez. It was a lot of fun.

RSP: You’ve been supervising for quite a while now. Do you miss the hands-on work of an artist?

MV: Visual effects is a collaborative effort. There needs to be someone to point everyone in the right direction. These days, I barely have time to sit down at my computer. I’m either looking over the shoulder of the guys or reviewing work in a theatre. I normally spend my nights doing cineSync with the rest of the world. It’s different supervising in a facility like RSP. Formerly, I was generally attached to a production and saw shots through from shooting to finish. Now, I’m generally on the receiving end of stuff that’s already been shot.

RSP: What do you hope to accomplish at RSP?

MV: That’s simple. Maintain the high standards the shop is known for, and deliver on time and on budget.



RSP was founded in 1995.
Contact us:

Level 1, 180 Pulteney Street Adelaide, South Australia 5000 Australia

+61 8 8400 6400 vfxinfo@rsp.com.au

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Contact us:

Level 1, 180 Pulteney Street Adelaide, South Australia 5000 Australia

+61 8 8400 6400 vfxinfo@rsp.com.au

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